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deficit has been cut in half. it allows us to meet our obligations to future generations. from the heard president, deficit picture is looking better. much so that levels will be below where they were before the budget crisis. >> how do republicans react to away from the emphasis on deficit reduction act out >? >> john baeder came out and said that this was the most irresponsible budget yet of the obama has proposed. the president laster put out an all french to republicans and said he was willing to make changes to social security, medicare and other entitlement programs. those are all gone this year. for republicans to look at these budgets in the lines of what the established last year in terms of topline numbers under the agreement, this budget is something that will not move in the house of republicans. are viewed asts more of political documents as opposed to policy proposals. >> that really is right. especially this year. yep midterms coming up in november. the white house wanted to lay out policy priorities going forward to follow through on over the next eight months. the presid
when we saw a deficit and policy toion is being designed rebalance the economy's and we're seeing that happen. while the trade deficits are coming down, the demand for products from emerging markets, whether commodities or manufactured goods, that demand is not growing as fast as it was when trade deficits were expanding. the markets are going to find the environment stuff. what is the concern china or deflation? >> i don't think there will be deflation and i think we will see a long time of low growth. i don't think inflation will be a problem. of alarm also it's bells and i like to put the word demand in front of deflation. and thatalling wages means following command and a negative spiral. it is not just falling prices. is lots of sectors. you see groups and things like that. falling realu have wages that that is the problem. the cycle that japan went through and if you do not touch it at the right time, it is difficult to turn around. are we in a scenario like that? deflation and the specter of it hanging over us unless handled correctly. >> one of the characteristics of japan
issue right now, deficit, debt, from the ministrations point of view, it is not something are focusing on right now. >> take you for setting the scene. -- thank you for setting the scene. york, our guest host, we have the chart of earlier. it is a massive victory lap. can we get back to a surplus? can we get back to that surplus? >> that is certainly not on the near-term horizon. what is important to note, three years ago the deficit was 10% of tdp and this year, 3%. it wasn't pretty. it didn't look like the civics textbooks, but we have a lot of deficit reduction. we had the ryan murphy agreement. it basically takes fiscal policy off the table for the next two years. barring a dramatic or election outcome in november, the administration will be status quo for 2017. >> are you willing to say austerity in the u.s. worked while austerity in europe did not work question mark -- work? able to register economic growth. it has been sluggish. europe has not been able to pull it off and a big impact of the fed he been the economy supported. >> the former fed governor, wonderful textbook, i don
with opportunity for all americans. at a time when the deficit is cut in half this allows us to meet our obligations to future generations without leaving them a mountain of debt. to the balance in congress but it also builds up on that progress with what we are calling an opportunity, growth and security initiative, that invests in our economic priorities in a smart way that is paid for with smart spending cuts and closing tax loopholes that right now only benefit the well-off and the well-connected. i will give you an example. right now the tax system provides benefits to wealthy individuals who save after they have amassed multimillion dollar retirement accounts. by closing that loophole we can help create jobs and grow the economy, and expand opportunity without adding a dime to the deficit. we know that the country that wins the race for new technologies will win new jobs so this creates 45 high-tech manufacturing hubs where universities and businesses will work for groundbreaking technology for new jobs in america. part of the reason we're here today is because education has to sta
and timing shifts to pay for permanent rate cuts. it could increase deficits in the second decade. >> i think it will be the opposite. it will generate more revenue. add $700 billion in new revenues to help us pay down the debt. cuts can getending us to a balanced budget. >> you think by the second decade it will raise revenues because of the dynamics. >> in the first decade. >> you drew a parallel to the 1986 tax reform under president reagan. one of the differences is that under that measure, the earned income tax credit for the poor was vastly expanded. under this proposal it would be cut back. ofoman making a minimum wage $17,000, she will lose $2000 in 4-5 years. should the poor have to pay the burden? >> they do not. everyone making up to $100,000 sees a tax cut. and, average family takes home -- >> that is cut back a little bit. >> it is not. in my view, it was supposed to offset the payroll tax. unfortunately it has gone beyond that. it is refocus back on making sure p road taxes are offset. more families have that opportunity, and it is a create that poverty trap where the harder you
the deficit with $17 trillion in debt. that is a failure on the democratic side and i am a democrat. tax reform that will not only simplify the tax code. this is to simply pay our bills. >> let's talk about bills that specifically the kind that get printed. isust -- and the new chair scheduled to testify tomorrow. her is we will hear from a projection of the continues to recover. we have the fact that moved from washington being net negative on the economic recovery, maybe the neutral. can be a positive aspect. a number of members will press on when we will see some additional relaxation and quantitative easing. >> is that what you're going to ask? are those the questions you'll ask? >> by the time they get down to me, i'm sure that they will be asked. one of the areas that i want to highlight is one of the coming fiscal crisis that we have to get ahead of her. we have now had a true billion dollars in student debt that exceeds credit card debt. we are starting to see the price diminish state and the federal support. with the rising college costs, we bought that off with debt. that is co
? it is contained. we do not think it is a contagion threat. in the so-called double deficit countries, they are quite small in terms of their exposure to the developed market angst. opportunityke this to buy more emerging-market equities right now? intoe you still buying other equity markets, more developed markets in the u.s. and eurozone? >> it depends on your timeframe. over the next six months, i don't see a lot of triggers that will send the emerging markets story into a by scenario. i would be cautious. the valuation discount is about 30% and that is attractive. and lot of contagion risk that is psychology with the ukraine and other stories is scary so i would be cautious to neutral on emerging markets right now. have thena does not risk of contagion, you mentioned the fragile five, which might present a risk when we talk about the contagion to emerging markets? >> i don't think any of the fragile five are a risk in the developed markets for a couple reasons. they are tiny. take argentina and venezuela and put them together, less than half a point of global gdp. they are really
lending that will be done. in other words, the tax will go not to reduce the deficit or debt and it will be less lending. why would we be doing that? it makes no sense. spoke with a hunt representative and i want to get your take. to 25, and you are right, 99% of taxpayers will be at 25% or less. 99% and a when i was in school. what we do that is have trade-offs. >> back to the one percent argument. does this thing stand a snowballs chance in hell passing? >> for the bank tax, i hope not, cost -- because you will have less lending. the panel that i was on, and simpson bowles, better known to the general public, we all recommended dramatic reduction rates and elimination of most exemptions, deductions, and credits. that is the only way you solve the problem. if you go at it piecemeal, whether a bank tax on mortgage interest eduction, you never get it resolved. the reality is you want to balance the budget and get the debt in line with where it ought to be. you are going to have to do very dramatic things. i am glad that conversation is starting. you are known as one of the mos
not do nearly enough to tackle the entitlement program. thepoint has been made deficit has come down so much in the short term, and that is true but there was a fiscal problem facing the country. the real problem is the medium and long-term debt. the real problem is dealing with health care, aging population and health reforms. -- let mee ask about ask about the private deck with a tax break the industry has gotten for years. it sounds like both sides ones that do go away. does that mean it will? not think so. far from obvious that both sides want it to go away. speaking fellow republicans. many walked away from that as soon as it came out. carried interest belongs as part of a broader tax reform, but none actually tax it correctly. it withet serious about something with integrity it is just convenient, and that is no way to do tax policy. real,ld do some meaningful tax reform. really hurt his base if he takes on entitlement reform in a way that means cutting entitlements in the future. >> can i say something about that? >> was that my? -- mya? hurting his about base might be true polit
happen to like, is going anywhere. >> what do you like about it? >> the deficit is going down considerably. >> is that from fiscal reform or from the economy growing? >> i think it is both. the sequester, which i did not happen to think is an intelligent approach, has been effective. have beenwe increasing revenue because of the economic recovery and the composition of the recovery. those two things and some others have resulted in the deficit coming down considerably. it is projected at 3.1% of gdp. it is way down. it was over 9%. we should step back and recognize that is good progress. you could debate who is responsible, but it is good progress. second, some of the initiatives, let's just take infrastructure, are so vitally needed. both sides agree, it is just how to pay for it. it is not going anywhere. senator johnson is right. it is an election year. this budget will just sit there and not be acted on. >> senator, you are saying it does not address the big issues, which you mentioned, entitlement spending. there were no big numbers around cutting social security or any o
that the russian budget is experiencing is that they are having an expanding deficit at $110 a barrel. if we go back several years, they're doing rather well balancing the budget at $60 a barrel. every single increased difficulty in funding export into what is the kremlin our needs and that is a full flow of finance. >> how much substitution can there be? are there ways around the situation? >> no. the energy crisis in the ukraine will become acute and quickly. , thered no difficulty was an arrangement that had been set up between ukraine and russian gas prom -- and russian azprom. there were supposed to be an extension of credit. all of that is over. it is back to cash on the barrel head and ukraine cannot afford to buy natural gas. an lngalking about terminal outside of odessa, but that will not particularly help. one problem people have not really looked at yet is the ukrainians, like a number of people in europe, have been relying on toward coal to offset the natural gas pricing situation. there are some reverberations this morning from the netscape onetsk. internally, we are having an ene
with good wages. at a time where deficit has been cut in half, it allows us to meet our obligations to future generations without leaving them a mountain of debt. >> republicans including john boehner called his budget the most irresponsible yet. they believe this is a campaign move that includes a whole host of issues that democrats like to campaign on on this midterm election year. this budget and the eyes of republicans and some democrats -- they are going to make some big changes. with the president has put the paper will change pretty quickly. >> thank you very much, peter cook. let's move on to media. the big story today was the entertainment network epix is joining the time warner cable family. it will be launched nationally on march 18. joining us to talk about this deal is the president and chief executive of epix, mark greenberg. also with us is jon erlichman. start usonder if you off by explaining what exactly this agreement means. has over 12er cable a half-million homes that they have access to. epix is a premium service similar to hbo or showtime or we have uncut, uned
the deficit sharply. that will end the corrupt subsidies to the coal and gas sector. >> where does this leave the eu? this is a country that if it were to become part of the eu would be bringing on a whole a lot of problems. it is effectively another grease type situation in terms of being in debt. eu'soes that leave the feeling toward ukraine knowing if they were to welcome them in, they would be taking on most -- a host of economic problems. ? one of the wings to bear in mind -- one of the things to bear in mind is that the ukraine is split between the east and west. many people in the west are pro-europe and those in the east are more pro-russia. i think we will have to wait to see what happens with the new government and whether they can forge a national unity before we can start talking about what this will mean for europe. >> thank you very much for joining us and we will continue checking in throughout the day. x and the senior fellow at the peterson institute in washington, d.c. you are looking at a live shot of the deposed ukrainian vichdent victor yanuoklo holding a press conference
differentiate as i look the key issue for me is who is dealing with a budget deficit or who is not raising interest rates. what is the critical issue for you? willdonesia for example mark itself out as different from the others. elsewhere,ine and don't be too concentrated in emerging markets. political risk is large and it is not very well-predicted by investors. do be well diversified. take some overweight and underweight positions. we tend to be overweight the small countries and underweight the largest ones. underweight the brics historically. that can be difficult when china is on a strong rally. good stead over the long term. >> what is going on in china? i come in everyday, we have the yuan on the move, we are trying to lure him the currency? there is something very interesting in the past couple of weeks in china. >> they have to squeeze the excess is out of the system and it is going to be painful. we talked about volatility earlier. we can expect that to spike up later in the year. there is going to be some headline news out of china as this credit excess is squeezed. i think the
it will be necessary. one of the goals is to have a deficit neutral budget by 2015. it will be hard for them to achieve that. decreaseto either public spending or privatization. one thing i am concerned about, it looks like we're interested in a transformation right now to more of a sovereign or hedge funds investor base. that is a difficult transition for that government. they will government demanding guarantees. it would also be some of the things attached to it, which may the bond issue doesn't work out and they cannot put together the right budget, people knuckle under and they have to jack up taxes. what would that mean for these kinds of properties? rican's who goo to this resort. will the business the fine regardless? >> a good point. tourism is one of the safe that's right now. there are continued -- everybody isees the economic turn down not about to stop. it will be a difficult time in the next years. that may attract more tourism. tourists is one thing. has he been successful with his plan to attract hedge funders, not to invest their but to move their? complicated more situation and even h
loss since the bailout in 2008. 15 billion-dollar deficit for last year. he calls rbs the industry's least trusted leader, does the ceo. >> the bank. the largest bailout in europe. still owns the vast majority of the bank and is still pulling the strings. >> by the way, wire pros playing in the olympics? >> that is what the nhl is asking -- the players love it. >> the players love it and flagwavers love it, i am not fair -- sure it is fair to college athletes. >> we need to go to the ukraine. we spoke with the new leadership to read good morning. >> good morning. his name is arseniy yatsenyuk, the prime minister designate. inis about it -- to be voted as the interim prime minister of the country for the next few months. parliament is still chewing over this decision. >> how front and center is crimea to the management in kiev? >> very front and center. i was standing in the parliament here in kiev. meanwhile, in the crimea, the parliament had just been seized by a group of about 100 gunmen. i asked the prime minister about that and he said it is the first crisis he has to deal with
to go into deficit as well. russia is ofat to course oil prices. the government spends about 25% of gdp and to keep the budget in balance, capital economics needs 100 $10rice of about per barrel. they are able to get that just barely but as american fracking increases the amount of supply in the world, their chances of getting that are going down. a rush road ahead -- rough road at thisr the economy point. >> if it is such a rough road and all the weakness, why is he risking this? pretend to want to tell you what he is thinking, but maybe it is short-term here. compared to where the u.s. is. russia has a large amount of foreign exchange reserves. they can pay their bills for now even as the current account goes negative. resident who may be gambling if this lasts a short time, they could get in and get out without any further consequences, it is worth the risk. >> thank you. mike mckee. ofturn to another region uncertainty. president obama met with netanyahu at the white house yesterday. closelyries that work in the past and he looks cooked -- looks forward to working with the president
on the largest deficit is one that is pretty sudden. they will behind going with the smaller parties and it is like a game of cricket. but they really want to see is to find the stable location that will bring in certainty and bring it back to the table. we will see that by the 16th of may. the upcomingout indian elections. >> when we come back, we will hear more about microsoft and the somebody who knows a thing or two about it. stay with us here on "countdown." ♪ >> welcome back to "countdown." microsoft former chief executive steve ballmer speaking one month after leaving the tech giant and bloomberg was there. for more, let's bring in caroline hyde with the details on what was a fascinating evening. >> wait for it. wait for it. there, on the bottom right. >> bloomberg presents the oxford union debate. with bloomberge having this relationship with the oxford union and he was fascinating. this is the first time he was x ceo. speak as the he is still on the board and one of the bigger shareholders but no longer running a. he spoke very eloquently about the concern that he did not
deficit issues. the need for sustainable fiscal path through the country to focus to the maximum extent possible on fiscal changes that would address the longer run issues that will be associated ratio rising debt to gdp over decades and to try to avoid doing harm to the recovery. i would take the same general position. a in the short run, there is value of additional physical stimulation in the economy that will complement what you are already doing and make it easier to withdraw the quantitative easing. is that a fair comment? >> i do think the economy is beginning to recover and we have made progress. minimum i would hope that fiscal policy would do no harm. >> one quick question. you and your predecessors have looked at the unemployment rate of 6.5% as a point of inflection if you will. one of the aspects of the labort situation is that participation is falling. that 6.5% might not actually capture the reality of the current economy. to be an adequate measure of undertakeeds to do to monetary easing. are you looking at other ways or looking beyond this unemployment rate to gauge you
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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